Explain Property Preservation - REO Property Preservation Forum
Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 140 (permalink) Old 04-10-2012, 04:54 AM
Kent Whitten
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Explain Property Preservation

Give me a minute, I am working on moving a bunch of posts
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 140 (permalink) Old 04-10-2012, 08:17 PM
Senior Member
 
RichR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: New York
Posts: 232
Thanks: 58
Thanked 125 Times in 63 Posts
Glad to see that all the non P&P guys still come around here to spread their wisdom. Without their vast knowledge, where would we be.
RichR is offline  
post #3 of 140 (permalink) Old 04-10-2012, 08:26 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 94
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichR
Glad to see that all the non P&P guys still come around here to spread their wisdom. Without their vast knowledge, where would we be.
Glad to see that you guys still need us to spread wisdom. Any time we can help, let us know.

I am still trying to unravel the mystery of P&P. Apparently you can only understand if you do re-cuts for $14.

But here's what I know. You sign up with companies who send you work like lawn maintenance, board up, winterizing, and the like. They require you to jump through a million hoops for little pay, you then go on the internet and whine about the whole process and that it's not fair. Fill in the blanks or just say that there is no way for our feeble minds to grasp the complicated thing called P&P.

BTW: last time I looked this is the land of opportunity. The first step of getting out of the hole is to stop digging!
TNTSERVICES is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 140 (permalink) Old 04-10-2012, 08:34 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 751
Thanks: 123
Thanked 504 Times in 253 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNTSERVICES
There isn't anything special or traditional about estimating. You have overhead that needs to be covered, you have payroll that needs to be covered, you have growth that needs to be covered, and you have profit that needs to be made. How it is any different? Either you can cover those items or you: go bankrupt, have angry employees (or go hungry yourself), don't plan on buying anything new or to make your job better or more profitable, or you don't like to save for a rainy day or your later years.

I don't see why P&P guys think that their profession is special and the normal rules of business don't apply. It seems to me that there are better ways to make money, but you would rather take what someone gives you and complain about the pay and their expectations you will forever be miserable.
You do not have a clue. For over 15 years I worked for commercial GCs, Drywall contractors and Framing contractors. I have managed entire companies and estimated thousands of commercial construction projects and managed hundreds of them. My projects ranged from a few hundred dollars to over eight million dollars.

While the same rules apply as far as OH&P. P&P is a different animal altogether. One of the big differences is the volume and the deadlines.
Picture having 50 jobs awarded to you on the same day and all of them have to be completed within a week. You have to provide hundreds of pictures documenting all phases of the work from the start to the finish.

The pictures have to be date stamped and uploaded in a specific format by a specific deadline or they are rejected and you do not get paid or you are fined for late submissions.

Then someone who has no clue as to what your job entails reviews the pictures and cuts your price when they feel the pictures do not justify the costs.

Any jobs that are not completed on time result in either a back charge or refusal to pay.

Since you agreed to cover all work in a specific territory when you decline a job they hire someone else to do it and if it costs more than the price you bid, or the price they estimated you would have bid if you did not bid it, you are charged the difference.

There is little you can do about the back charges because it is taken from your next draw and if you complain too much, or lien a property, they will never ever give you work again, which sounds fine until you realize that you are going to be without any work until you find a new customer to replace them and if you do not find someone fast your competition will be doing a trashout on your house.

P&P is a special kind of business. The simple fact is that most regular contractors could not handle this type of work because it does not follow the rules of traditional work or business. It has its own rules. It is chaotic.

In traditional contracting you know about most jobs weeks or months in advance of starting them and you have an organized schedule to follow that orchestrates the order of the work and keeps the project flowing.

In P&P it is about as close to complete chaos as you can get and still have a plan. Almost every decision is reactionary because you have little or no time to plan.

How would your jobs run if every day you showed up at the office and had to check your emails and fax machine to see what you and your crew was going to be doing that day and for the next few days?

At most you usually only get a few days to plan and proceed with a project.

P&P operates on a seven day schedule and there is no overtime, ever. Period. Charge overtime if you want, you just won't get the work.

I find it comical when the regular contractors stray outside their areas of expertise and offer sarcastic or, at least from the perspective of a P&P Contractor, just plain stupid comments or advice.
Gypsos is offline  
post #5 of 140 (permalink) Old 04-10-2012, 08:38 PM
Kent Whitten
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNTSERVICES
Glad to see that you guys still need us to spread wisdom. Any time we can help, let us know.

I am still trying to unravel the mystery of P&P. Apparently you can only understand if you do re-cuts for $14.

But here's what I know. You sign up with companies who send you work like lawn maintenance, board up, winterizing, and the like. They require you to jump through a million hoops for little pay, you then go on the internet and whine about the whole process and that it's not fair. Fill in the blanks or just say that there is no way for our feeble minds to grasp the complicated thing called P&P.

BTW: last time I looked this is the land of opportunity. The first step of getting out of the hole is to stop digging!
I was thinking that this was so fitting

Quote:
Chapter 1

I walk down the street.
There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.
I fall in.
I am lost ... I am helpless.
It isn't my fault.
It takes forever to find a way out.

Chapter 2

I walk down the same street.
There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.
I pretend I don't see it.
I fall in again.
I can't believe I am in the same place.
But it isn't my fault.
It still takes a long time to get out.

Chapter 3

I walk down the same street.
There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.
I see it is there.
I still fall in ... it's a habit.
My eyes are open.
I know where I am.
It is my fault.
I get out immediately.

Chapter 4

I walk down the same street.
There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.
I walk around it.

Chapter 5

I walk down another street.


~ Portia Nelson ~
post #6 of 140 (permalink) Old 04-10-2012, 08:40 PM
Kent Whitten
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gypsos
You do not have a clue.

One of the big differences is the volume and the deadlines.

Picture having 50 jobs awarded to you on the same day and all of them have to be completed within a week. You have to provide hundreds of pictures documenting all phases of the work from the start to the finish.

The pictures have to be date stamped and uploaded in a specific format by a specific deadline or they are rejected and you do not get paid or you are fined for late submissions.

Then someone who has no clue as to what your job entails reviews the pictures and cuts your price when they feel the pictures do not justify the costs.

Any jobs that are not completed on time result in either a back charge or refusal to pay.

Since you agreed to cover all work in a specific territory when you decline a job they hire someone else to do it and if it costs more than the price you bid, or the price they estimated you would have bid if you did not bid it, you are charged the difference.

There is little you can do about the back charges because it is taken from your next draw and if you complain too much, or lien a property, they will never ever give you work again, which sounds fine until you realize that you are going to be without any work until you find a new customer to replace them and if you do not find someone fast your competition will be doing a trashout on your house.

P&P is a special kind of business. The simple fact is that most regular contractors could not handle this type of work because it does not follow the rules of traditional work or business. It has its own rules. It is chaotic.

In traditional contracting you know about most jobs weeks or months in advance of starting them and you have an organized schedule to follow that orchestrates the order of the work and keeps the project flowing.

In P&P it is about as close to complete chaos as you can get and still have a plan. Almost every decision is reactionary because you have little or no time to plan.

How would your jobs run if every day you showed up at the office and had to check your emails and fax machine to see what you and your crew was going to be doing that day and for the next few days?

At most you usually only get a few days to plan and proceed with a project.

P&P operates on a seven day schedule and there is no overtime, ever. Period. Charge overtime if you want, you just won't get the work.
yes.....we know all this. Tell us something we DON'T.
post #7 of 140 (permalink) Old 04-10-2012, 08:42 PM
Kent Whitten
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Actually, tell us the reason that YOU would continue working in this environment. That's what we DON'T understand.
post #8 of 140 (permalink) Old 04-10-2012, 08:57 PM
Tech Dawg
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Whitten
Actually, tell us the reason that YOU would continue working in this environment. That's what we DON'T understand.
Here's what I don't understand... Are P&P pepes considered contractors...? ... I thought this was Contractor Talk...
post #9 of 140 (permalink) Old 04-10-2012, 08:58 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 751
Thanks: 123
Thanked 504 Times in 253 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Whitten
Actually, tell us the reason that YOU would continue working in this environment. That's what we DON'T understand.
Actually I enjoy it. I started by accident when the idiots I worked for ran their company into the ground and I found myself out of work with no prospects. My kids were hungry, my house payment was late and someone offered me work.

I have found a niche in the market area I cover and I make it a point to do it better than everyone else in this area. I get all the work I want, my kids are no longer hungry and my house payment is current.

On the rare occasion I do lose on a job I am out less than $100. Not the thousands I lost because "You cannot afford to hire an attorney to sue us so we do not have to pay you."

Yeah, I will take this industry over the cesspit that the construction industry has become.
Gypsos is offline  
post #10 of 140 (permalink) Old 04-10-2012, 09:04 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 751
Thanks: 123
Thanked 504 Times in 253 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tech Dawg
Here's what I don't understand... Are P&P pepes considered contractors...? ... I thought this was Contractor Talk...
The answer is yes. See below for clarification. Googles definition.

con·trac·tor/ˈkänˌtraktər/ Noun: A person or company that undertakes a contract to provide materials or labor to perform a service or do a job. Synonyms: entrepreneur
Gypsos is offline  
Closed Thread

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the REO Property Preservation Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome