Roofing Question - REO Property Preservation Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 07-28-2012, 10:13 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
BamaPPC's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Alabama
Posts: 414
Thanks: 95
Thanked 283 Times in 133 Posts
Roofing Question

I'll preface this by saying: I AM NOT A PROFESSIONAL ROOFER.

But, in my youth, I worked as part of a crew that put on a roof or two, metal, roll, and asphalt shingle. So I've seen how a roof goes together.

Today I was just surfing around the internet looking for things pertaining to a job I'm bidding. It's an outbuilding roof that needs replacing. It's asphalt shingle. I was figuring up the squares I was going to need and I remeber a square as being 9 feet by 9 feet or 81 sqft of coverage. But, it's really been awhile since I had learned that bit of trivia. So, just being curious and thorough, and to be sure they hadn't down sized shingles. I went on a hunt. I came across an article on ehow.com about putting on a shingle roof. As part of the instructions it says :

"Place and lay out the roofing felt over the plywood boards that form the first layer of the house’s roof. The boards are placed and nailed down by the carpenters who worked on the house, so you need not concern yourself with this layer. When putting the felt down remember that this is meant to be a waterproof seal on the roof. Lay the felt down one roll at a time. They should be in vertical rows from the apex of the roof down to its edge; the sides of each row should overlap slightly. Nail the sides of one row firmly into place before moving onto the next until the entire room is covered."

There a part of that instruction that goes against the way I've seen it done, and always done it.

They should be in vertical rows from the apex of the roof down to its edge;

Anybody else do it this way? And if so, why? I've always rolled the felt out horizontal, starting at the eave working up to the peak. With each row overlapping the one beneath. Thus giving a shield that runs down the roof and can shed water even if the shingle becomes damaged.

Running it verticle would also seem to be dangerous. Since you are at the eave cutting off a heavy roll of felt so many times. And having to control the roll all the way down so many times.

Look forward to seeing the responses.
BamaPPC is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 07-28-2012, 10:30 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 29
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
a square in my neck of the woods is 100 sq ft,no matter how you measure it
Tom Stuble is offline  
post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 07-28-2012, 10:38 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
BamaPPC's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Alabama
Posts: 414
Thanks: 95
Thanked 283 Times in 133 Posts
Thanks Tom. I realize that's how a square is measured today. But, the old man that taught me (geez, has it been that long) 35 years ago. Always said a square was 9ft x 9ft coverage. things change I guess. Back then, maybe he never wanted to be short of shingles on the job.

Doesn't matter because - that wasn't the question I asked.
BamaPPC is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 07-28-2012, 10:40 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 29
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
i care not for questions
Tom Stuble is offline  
post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 07-28-2012, 11:35 AM
SLSTech
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Struble
i care not for questions
Thanks Tom, I needed the laugh --- Want to know what is even funnier - it is actually seeing how many "roofers" do that around here

Bama - review the manufacturers directions, it is all covered there including coverage, starter strips, ridge caps, etc...
post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 07-28-2012, 11:42 AM
4 seasons
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
The measurement of a square has never changed. Lol
Felt goes from side to side brother.
post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 07-28-2012, 12:01 PM
VinylHanger
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Never heard of the felt going from top to bottom. This is a case of trusting the first thing you come to on the net. Don't worry, it has caught all of us at one time or another.

However, if you honestly are questioning that method and had any thought that it might be correct, call a roofer to deal with this job.

On the other hand, if you were just wondering WTF the guy on that site was thinking, then go right ahead and roof it. What's the worst that could happen?
post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 07-28-2012, 12:03 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 29
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
he will over order by about 20 percent
Tom Stuble is offline  
post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 07-28-2012, 12:16 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 694
Thanks: 42
Thanked 129 Times in 74 Posts
Or, make 20% more on the job

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Struble
he will over order by about 20 percent
SwiftRes is offline  
post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 07-28-2012, 12:26 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
BamaPPC's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Alabama
Posts: 414
Thanks: 95
Thanked 283 Times in 133 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by VinylHanger
Never heard of the felt going from top to bottom. This is a case of trusting the first thing you come to on the net. Don't worry, it has caught all of us at one time or another.

However, if you honestly are questioning that method and had any thought that it might be correct, call a roofer to deal with this job.

On the other hand, if you were just wondering WTF the guy on that site was thinking, then go right ahead and roof it. What's the worst that could happen?
LMAO, funny. It was more of a WTH? Never heard of it being done that way...just wanted to see if I was so far behind the times that there was a new way of doing it. I can tell you if I am to put down felt, it's going horizontal.

And, that old man, just may have been accounting for ridge caps, starter courses, and waste. Figuring it at 9x9 gave him the extra shingle to complete the job. I couldn't tell you for sure. And he's been dead for years, so the mystery is lost. And probably wasn't ever relevant. I know the square foot coverage wasn't relevant to my question.
BamaPPC is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the REO Property Preservation Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome