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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-23-2014, 10:11 AM Thread Starter
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types of oil

Hey everybody just wondering when you all service your mowers to get ready for the grass cut season what type or brand of oil do you use? I run a farriss mower with a big block briggs the dealer told me they service them and use 15w40 lucas. I know lucas is good oil but do you all think that 15w40 is to thick to use ? Any comments or suggestions
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-23-2014, 10:26 AM
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Yikes, I think 40 weight is way too thick for today's small engines.
When even automotive big blocks are running 5w20 I don't think you want to see more than 10w30 in your small engines.
I actually run a very thin oil in the engines during the winter. (the ones that are on snow removal detail)
5w20 in the spring and fall months and 10w30 in the summer hottest months.

Professionals are people who can do their job when they don't feel like it.
Amateurs are people that can't do their job even when they do feel like it.
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-23-2014, 12:49 PM
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10W30 at the most. Central Kentucky still gets plenty cold, and even recently we have seen oil in our mowers and chainsaws in the morning that had the consistency of taffy.
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-23-2014, 08:46 PM
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5/30 in the winter, sae30 in the spring and fall and 15-40 when it gets hot. It will take higher temps than 10-30........
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-24-2014, 04:28 PM
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15w40 in a small engine?????????????

That is diesel oil and probably way too thick for small engines even when hot.

Professionals are people who can do their job when they don't feel like it.
Amateurs are people that can't do their job even when they do feel like it.
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-24-2014, 08:23 PM
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15w40 in a small engine?????????????

That is diesel oil and probably way too thick for small engines even when hot.

Been doing it for 25 years with no issues. I run 10w30 ore SAE30 during the cooler months and 15w40 late June - early Sept. It has a better detergent package and keeps air cooled engines cleaner. I still have an Ariens walk behind with a 6.5 Briggs on it that i used for trimming about 3-4 hours a week year around in Florida for 5 years and i use it 2-3 times a week in the summer here. Been here for 10 years. Actually a multi-vis oil such as a 5w or 10W in an air cooled engine in hot conditions will burn some oil. 15W40 doesn't burn off. The engine will start easier than when using a SAE 30 which BTW is recommended by almost all manufacturers and the oil will hold up to high temps and fuel dilution better than a SAE 30 for reasonable intervals. A little sheer or dilution and you're still solidly in 30 weight territory.
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-26-2014, 08:18 AM
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I run synthetics in everything from my diesel 1ton to my 2 cycle trimmers. Cost is higher up front but intervals are longer, and the 2 cycles don't smoke or dribble black out of the exhaust when in the back of the van!
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-26-2014, 08:37 PM
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Maybe I am crazy, but I run whatever weight the manufacturer recommends.
I will get synthetic if possible.

New Kawasaki engines require either Kawasaki brand oil in a straight 30w or straight 40w in other brands or they will void the warranty.

I run 10w30 synthetic in the Kohler I rebuilt 4 years ago.
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-29-2014, 10:51 AM
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Maybe I am crazy, but I run whatever weight the manufacturer recommends.
I will get synthetic if possible.

New Kawasaki engines require either Kawasaki brand oil in a straight 30w or straight 40w in other brands or they will void the warranty.

I run 10w30 synthetic in the Kohler I rebuilt 4 years ago.
Manufacturers recommendations are a blanket for everyone throughout the country. No different than HUD guidelines. What's good for the Goose is NOT always whats good for the Gander. I use what works for my area and use my mechanical education to make my decisions. Take the plug out of that Kawasaki down by the oil filter and put an oil pressure gauge in. Then try different oils. You'll be VERY surprised the difference in oil pressure ESPECIALLY in the heat you have in Florida. An air cooled engine depends on air to cool it (i know, DUH) 95* air across the fins will not draw near the heat out of the engine that 65* air will. Liquid cooled engines that keep consistent temperatures i would not be concerned about. FWIW, Once you get an air cooled engine hot and it starts sucking oil there is no way to slow down consumption. I prefer to avoid that situation.........
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-30-2014, 10:41 PM
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Originally Posted by mtmtnman View Post
Manufacturers recommendations are a blanket for everyone throughout the country. No different than HUD guidelines. What's good for the Goose is NOT always whats good for the Gander. I use what works for my area and use my mechanical education to make my decisions. Take the plug out of that Kawasaki down by the oil filter and put an oil pressure gauge in. Then try different oils. You'll be VERY surprised the difference in oil pressure ESPECIALLY in the heat you have in Florida. An air cooled engine depends on air to cool it (i know, DUH) 95* air across the fins will not draw near the heat out of the engine that 65* air will. Liquid cooled engines that keep consistent temperatures i would not be concerned about. FWIW, Once you get an air cooled engine hot and it starts sucking oil there is no way to slow down consumption. I prefer to avoid that situation.........
It has a three year commercial warranty that is good only as long as I run the Kawasaki brand oil in a straight 30w or straight 40w in other brand. From my experience the biggest problem is people do not let the engine warm up before slamming the gas to full speed or cool down before they shut it off.

I have a friend who owns a large lawn company. He has about 60 X-Marks with Kohler engines. The best time he gets is about 1200 hours. He runs only AmsOil in them and changes the oil in all of them once a week. He has to keep two crate motors on the shelf ready to go at all times.

The problem is his guys fire it up cold with the engine on full blast and after hours of cutting non stop they run it onto the trailer and shut it off still running wide open. His mechanic told me the same thing happens every time. The valves stretch from the abuse and eventually hit the top of the cylinder.

I warm mine up and cool them down when I use them and go totally freaked out ape sh*t off on anyone that doesn't.
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