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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know we have had long discussions about the famous bleach clean and cover with Kilz topic.
I went to a property the other day for a private client of mine that bought a foreclosed property. (4b/r, 3 bath). Well guess what, apparently the house had major water and mold damage.
The hack that fixed it before this person bought it used the above method, a matter of fact they left (6) 5 gallon buckets of Kilz at the property.
About 90% of the house has the mold growing back since the bleach does not kill the mold on the other side. I am waiting to see how this plays out.
Then they yell at us when we will not do it that way.
 

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I turned down 4 jobs last month because they wanted me to do that procedure for the "discoloration" . They said if i didnt start doing them they would no longer send work orders my way. They lied about that
 

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I have been researching HUD guidelines for treatment of mold and have not been able to find anything about having a licensed mold specialist to come in and take care of this Hud guidelines what I have found are as followed
.1 Guidelines for Mitigation and Personal Protection
Common intervention methods reported in the literature for residential mitigation of mold
hazards include:
Location and removal of sources of moisture (control of dampness and humidity
and repair of water leakage problems).
Increasing ventilation.
Use of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters.
Maintenance of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems.
Cleaning of mold contaminated materials.
Physical removal of materials with severe mold growth and porous materials
that cannot be cleaned.
Prevention of spore infiltration from outdoors by closing doors and windows
and by using air conditioning.
I have read a lot of comments where no one is going to clean it So I guess my question is that if HUD is allowing it to be clean then is it against the rules since they are the ones that supposedly make the rules Just a thought I am not attacking just trying to get answers I always request for a mold specialist but according to what I have been reading in HUD you do not have to have one
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The whole problem is that if you just "clean it" and it is not done properly then you are the one that will be held liable, including financially. The nationals and HUD are not going to get hit YOU ARE.
 

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Anyone doin this should attempt to get signed agreement from national agreeing they know it doesn't cure the problem but only hides it. And does not hold the contractor liable if future problems occur related to this method of "curing" mold. If only they'd agree to this....
 

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Anyone doin this should attempt to get signed agreement from national agreeing they know it doesn't cure the problem but only hides it. And does not hold the contractor liable if future problems occur related to this method of "curing" mold. If only they'd agree to this....

They would never agree to that
 

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Browneyedgirl,

Sure you can clean... Every mold job entails cleaning. The big thing is: Do you have the proper equipment to do the cleaning, the proper protocols and the Commercial Pollution Liability?

How to bid a mold job to a national or regional? "Bid is $750 to obtain an environmental hygentist to determine type of fungi and to prepare a proper scope of work". Check your local pricing with hygentists to determine cost of testing--here it avgs $700-$750 with a protocol and $400-$500 w/o protocols. Many, if not most, will not provide a protocol to an uncertified contractor since they dont want to have their name on that project being done by untrained or underequiped contractors.

That list is another reflection on the incompetance of government agencies! Heck the EPA site said "clean with bleach solution" for many years till they were sued and then it took 3 additional years for them to update their website....
 

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I have been researching HUD guidelines for treatment of mold and have not been able to find anything about having a licensed mold specialist to come in and take care of this Hud guidelines what I have found are as followed
.1 Guidelines for Mitigation and Personal Protection
Common intervention methods reported in the literature for residential mitigation of mold
hazards include:
Location and removal of sources of moisture (control of dampness and humidity
and repair of water leakage problems).
Increasing ventilation.
Use of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters.
Maintenance of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems.
Cleaning of mold contaminated materials.
Physical removal of materials with severe mold growth and porous materials
that cannot be cleaned.
Prevention of spore infiltration from outdoors by closing doors and windows
and by using air conditioning.
I have read a lot of comments where no one is going to clean it So I guess my question is that if HUD is allowing it to be clean then is it against the rules since they are the ones that supposedly make the rules Just a thought I am not attacking just trying to get answers I always request for a mold specialist but according to what I have been reading in HUD you do not have to have one

where does this sate "Bleach and cover with kilz" ????
This is a HUD reg. so "cleaning" would involve PROPER methods not placing a bandaid on the bleeding artery....
While that does not give a reference to direct you to somewhere I'm betting if you look deeper you will not find bleach the area and cover with kilz.....
PS....Porous materials that can not be cleaned....sheetrock
 

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where does this sate "Bleach and cover with kilz" ????
This is a HUD reg. so "cleaning" would involve PROPER methods not placing a bandaid on the bleeding artery....
While that does not give a reference to direct you to somewhere I'm betting if you look deeper you will not find bleach the area and cover with kilz.....
PS....Porous materials that can not be cleaned....sheetrock
Cleaning of mold contaminated materials.
It doesn't say how to it just says to Clean so my question to you would be where does it say not to and it also says it is not required to hire a specialist but I still place in my bid to meet with a mold specialist never get them back so obviously a lot of contractors are as you call are putting band aids on it To me if this is there standard that they have put in place they would have it least put a measure of treatment Just a thought
 

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BrownEyedGirl....

Porous materials....sheetrock...wood...any construction material that breaths is porous....
Tile...a bathtub, the commode silicone(maybe), stainless steel, plastic, etc...those would be classified as non-porous....
 

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BrownEyedGirl....

Porous materials....sheetrock...wood...any construction material that breaths is porous....
Tile...a bathtub, the commode silicone(maybe), stainless steel, plastic, etc...those would be classified as non-porous....
Thanks for the information I am already aware of difference between porous and non porous I am just researching in to get the facts I have even went to EPA standard Clean only with detergent remove if cannot be cleaned I am just wandering however if the reason the Nationals are asking for Kiltz is to show that it still bleeds through then it is considered active so they can get the bid to remove it that is if the contractors are reporting that it needs to be removed but I still personally will keep on bidding for a professional and let them give it to someone else:thumbsup:
 

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Had similar baloney and cheese from a National last week. First contractor bid to kilz the basement per their work order. The Nat sits on it for 2 months, then sends them the approval. The basement is now a mess so they rebid it, which was refused, and told to complete the original order. Second contractor (former sub of mine) bids to cut out the wall board, remove trim, carpets and fixtures. They refused the order after the National cut their bid. When we get it, the basement has been sitting with an inch of water and it's in the ceiling, the studs, the ductwork, etc. Our price was high four figures and I won't hear from them anytime soon. The best thing to happen to that first contractor was not taking the $700 to paint the walls.
 

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I know we have had long discussions about the famous bleach clean and cover with Kilz topic.
I went to a property the other day for a private client of mine that bought a foreclosed property. (4b/r, 3 bath). Well guess what, apparently the house had major water and mold damage.
The hack that fixed it before this person bought it used the above method, a matter of fact they left (6) 5 gallon buckets of Kilz at the property.
About 90% of the house has the mold growing back since the bleach does not kill the mold on the other side. I am waiting to see how this plays out.
Then they yell at us when we will not do it that way.
I had the bleach conversation with the guys at work and one was telling me that chlorine is what they iused to use back in the day REAL strong
 
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