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I talked to a realtor who said mid year July first we could be looking for a new vocation. ALL properties are going to be occcoupied and the properties are going to be short sold ! cutting us out of the picture. It does not suprise me as FAS has cut the pricing way down and on some items expect us to go backwards !! Yes backwards. Seems like they (FAS) are milking this cow and when it happens ( I hope it does not) mid year they wont have to worry, as tehy have beat us down enough to cover their asses. They are just an OPM company. They have NO operating costs as they get their money up front. SO we are funding their company. OOPS and OPM company is AN "Other Peoples Money" company.

Anyone else caught wind of this ??:whistling
 
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Up this way we have lots of tenant occupied work from FAS.

Bids are turning around real quick from FAS.Its crazy they always try to cut my plumbers estimates,but just the other day they paid more for me install space heaters than what my plumber wanted to get the heat running.
 
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What the "rumor mill" is.....the first option after filing foreclosure is for the realtors to find the occupants and offer the tenant access option as the first choice OR the foreclosure will proceed.

Mixed feelings on this.....
 

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mtmtnman said:
Good way to get the properties trashed further. No stake in the game. Why take care of it!!!
I agree wholeheartedly. The rents on most of these are very, very low and so are the deposits. They can trash them and walk away and not lose much in the process.

We are already posting signs and securing these properties. Most are already trashed or falling down and there's no indication that the banks are going to clean them up before they rent them out. Time will tell.

Something to consider, though.......... In California, a landlord only has 21 days to produce receipts for cleaning and damages, once a tenant moves, or they have to return the deposits. No doubt other states have landlord/tenant laws that are similar.

I can see these rental situations backfiring on the banks big time. If they're not concerned about cleaning them up now, I highly doubt they will clean them up when the tenants move.

They will be destroyed even further and those tenants will still get their deposits back. And, most likely, after months of not paying rent............ unless there's a clause in the agreement that deposits will be used towards unpaid rent.

Linda
 

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I haven't been involved/informed on this rent situation on REOs.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm hearing both that the banks have to honor existing leases if the landlord is foreclosed on, as well as that the banks are renting REOs? What prevents the rent price in the first scenario from being well below market?
 

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SwiftRes said:
I haven't been involved/informed on this rent situation on REOs.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm hearing both that the banks have to honor existing leases if the landlord is foreclosed on, as well as that the banks are renting REOs? What prevents the rent price in the first scenario from being well below market?
If they honor the existing lease, they have to honor the existing monthly lease amount. They can't break one part of an agreement and honor the other.

They do have the option, however, to offer a new agreement. The tenant has the option to say no, though, and hold the bank to the existing contract.

Is that what you were asking?

Linda
 

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Yes, it does somewhat, but my question is what prevents the homeowner/landlord from leasing a $200k home to a friend for $500/mo for 2 years while they are in the foreclosure process?
 

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SwiftRes said:
Yes, it does somewhat, but my question is what prevents the homeowner/landlord from leasing a $200k home to a friend for $500/mo for 2 years while they are in the foreclosure process?
I'm sure it's been done and I'm sure banks have been forced to honor the agreements. Until the bank actually takes possession of the property, by eviction or a cash for keys move out, the owner/landlord can draft any kind of lease agreement he likes for whatever terms he wants, with regard to length of time and amount.

To me, it doesn't seem like it should be legal but it is. Sure does speak to the morality of the owner/landlord, tho.

And along those lines, as long as it's in the contract that the tenant/friend can sublet the property, there's nothing keeping the owner/landlord from moving back in and paying the lower fees to the bank.

Linda
 

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Agree with the morality piece, but I've seen about everything. Investors purchasing short sales has been a bad one sometimes. When I was an RE agent there were some BPOs you would avoid as you knew the investor would meet you there and hound and pressure you into putting in the BPO well below market value so they could scoop it up cheap.

a1propertyclean said:
I'm sure it's been done and I'm sure banks have been forced to honor the agreements. Until the bank actually takes possession of the property, by eviction or a cash for keys move out, the owner/landlord can draft any kind of lease agreement he likes for whatever terms he wants, with regard to length of time and amount.

To me, it doesn't seem like it should be legal but it is. Sure does speak to the morality of the owner/landlord, tho.

And along those lines, as long as it's in the contract that the tenant/friend can sublet the property, there's nothing keeping the owner/landlord from moving back in and paying the lower fees to the bank.

Linda
 

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SwiftRes said:
Agree with the morality piece, but I've seen about everything. Investors purchasing short sales has been a bad one sometimes. When I was an RE agent there were some BPOs you would avoid as you knew the investor would meet you there and hound and pressure you into putting in the BPO well below market value so they could scoop it up cheap.
When you do BPOs, your obligation is to the bank/client. If I were doing them, investors could hound all day long and not get anywhere at all.

If you drop the value on that house to accommodate an investor, not only are you a party to [possible] conspiracy to defraud the bank but devaluing one house affects the entire neighborhood.

Linda
 
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OH its happening alright! IN MN we saw this all the time to delay the bank from taking possession.

Rent home to friend for $400/month when the loan payment was $2000/month and the bank has to abide by this lease. Funny thing is that I have seen leases for 5 years and well below market rate. Deal of a lifetime!

Then to make it worse...the original homeowner gets a HUGE deposit paid to the homeowner. Its on craigslist happening all the time.

Had a Doctor went back for a Surgical Residency at U of Iowa and the day we were changing locks his Atlas Moving Lines Semi trucks pulled up (2) and 2 mercedes and they wanted to know WTH was going on....Well so did we! He met the moving trucks after moving from Florida to complete the Surgical School and had a lease for 6 years. WFHM made us change the locks back to an unknown code. He lived there for 18 months without paying a nickel in rent since he knew nobody to pay it to.

Sweet deal on a $500,000 house (in Iowa that is a mansion at that price) :)
 

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Agree 100%. But when you are making $75 for an interior BPO it's much easier money when there is no one at the property, so naturally you avoid the difficult ones. I am sure there are some agents that did it, though, as I know of some cases where short sales went well below what they should have.

I have also been involved in some, though, in which they should have been approved but didn't. I was selling a short sale back '04/'05 in which the seller owed $90-$95k. We had a buyer at $85k, tried to get the bank to agree to $75k, they wouldn't do it. Bank foreclosed, got property, sold about 6 months later for $45k. The previous homeowner had some "do it yourself" unfinished remodels that caused water damage.

a1propertyclean said:
When you do BPOs, your obligation is to the bank/client. If I were doing them, investors could hound all day long and not get anywhere at all.

If you drop the value on that house to accommodate an investor, not only are you a party to [possible] conspiracy to defraud the bank but devaluing one house affects the entire neighborhood.

Linda
 

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These are potential investors, right?

You could have told them that your insurance won't allow anyone on the property but you. I do it to keep nosy neighbors from coming in and looking around while I'm trying to do my job.

Until the investor owns the property, he's trespassing if he sets one foot on it without agent representation. Now if the investor is also an agent, I'm not sure how you'd handle that. My guess is there would still be some sort of protocol he/she has to take care of to gain access.

Linda
 

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He would have homeowners permission. On these particular BPOs we'd have to call the seller to setup a time to come through the home, as they still owned the home, and often times still occupied it.

a1propertyclean said:
These are potential investors, right?

You could have told them that your insurance won't allow anyone on the property but you. I do it to keep nosy neighbors from coming in and looking around while I'm trying to do my job.

Until the investor owns the property, he's trespassing if he sets one foot on it without agent representation. Now if the investor is also an agent, I'm not sure how you'd handle that. My guess is there would still be some sort of protocol he/she has to take care of to gain access.

Linda
 

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SwiftRes said:
He would have homeowners permission. On these particular BPOs we'd have to call the seller to setup a time to come through the home, as they still owned the home, and often times still occupied it.
What a drag. So the homeowners must have pre-arranged to contact them when they set up the appointment with you. I was under the presumption you were talking about vacant properties.

Linda
 

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Yeah, the investor would typically contact the sellers at some point durign foreclosure and then be the buyer on the purchase agreement. The investor helps the sellers submit the PA to the bank and facilitate the short sale process. The sellers were only concerned about getting rid of the house, they didn't care the price.

a1propertyclean said:
What a drag. So the homeowners must have pre-arranged to contact them when they set up the appointment with you. I was under the presumption you were talking about vacant properties.

Linda
 

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Renting out these properties at below market rates will kill the market.
Rental markets are better these days due to more former homeowners and tighter lending, but it can't hold up if it has to compete with the government on rents and tenants. Section 8 and subsidized housing is another animal altogether.
 

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GTX63 said:
Renting out these properties at below market rates will kill the market.
Rental markets are better these days due to more former homeowners and tighter lending, but it can't hold up if it has to compete with the government on rents and tenants. Section 8 and subsidized housing is another animal altogether.
This is how socialism takes over. The government has their hand in a lot of these.
 

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It is my understanding that the lease agreement must pre-date the NOD date, at least in California. It is also my opinion that the REO turned rentals by the banks are going to backfire on the banks. The banks are just looking for ways to get richer by holding onto the real estate in a down market and generate revenue in the meantime by becoming the landlord (what the investors are doing). When the market rebounds, because it always does, they feel they will be in a good position. In their estimation, it is a win-win for them. It's a business decision just like it was a business decision with the lending frenzy with NINJA loans (no job, no income, no assets) and they knew they were going to make their money on bad loans.
 
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