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Any members that do preservation work, I would appreciate help on this issue:

What is the best way to complete H20 line blow-outs when the home has no power to run a compressor? I have never had the need to own a generator, but am now thinking I will need one to complete this type of work. Of course, I have now read that running compressors with generators is a no-no.

I am fairly new to the preservation work, and am definitely looking for any tricks of the trade. I take pride in my work(even when it's obvious that a lot of guys doing this don't, or the banks that are hiring don't care) but I still want to be efficient and make a buck. Thanks for any advice and I look forward to hearing from you. I'm in Portland OR btw.

Derek
 
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Discussion Starter #2
you should be able to use a generator with a compressor if it is big enough, or you can get a gas fired compressor
 
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You will need at least 4-5000 watt generator to run most compressors and the compressor needs to be at least 4cfm+ to really force the water out, even more so on bigger houses!
 

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dgarcia said:
Any members that do preservation work, I would appreciate help on this issue:

What is the best way to complete H20 line blow-outs when the home has no power to run a compressor? I have never had the need to own a generator, but am now thinking I will need one to complete this type of work. Of course, I have now read that running compressors with generators is a no-no.

I am fairly new to the preservation work, and am definitely looking for any tricks of the trade. I take pride in my work(even when it's obvious that a lot of guys doing this don't, or the banks that are hiring don't care) but I still want to be efficient and make a buck. Thanks for any advice and I look forward to hearing from you. I'm in Portland OR btw.

Derek
You need a gas powered air compressor. They run about $850. Most electric compressors aren't strong enough. You can't make it in this business with electric powered tools. They're not meant to take the beating your tools will go through.

Good luck!
 
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To all, thank you for the quick reply and the information. This is about what I had expected regarding the size of generator and/or the need to just get a gas powered compressor. I would generally have no need for either upgrade to my 6 gallon compressor for my normal repair/remodel business, but the pres. work entails some specific tools of the trade to get the jobs done expediently.

I find the work interesting, definitely a little weird sometimes, and definitely challenging to make a profit (at this point I am contracting with a company located in Los Angeles). It's frustrating to put in good work, bust tail to get jobs done on time, and put forth quality bids only to see bids get low balled or to have processors "mistakenly" short change payment due! Do you folks contract directly with banks and REO companies or sub for larger management companies? OR do all?
I would really like to grow this business and have a quality company that people can depend on, but it sure is tough coming out of the gates! I guess I got off track here, but it's nice to find an outlet with people doing the same. Thanks again, and I look forward to being a contributor to this forum.

Derek
 

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Lawn Mower Man said:
You will need at least 4-5000 watt generator to run most compressors and the compressor needs to be at least 4cfm+ to really force the water out, even more so on bigger houses!






4 cfm??????????? my gas compressor is twice that.... its not enough. Too slow.

4 cfm is doubtful to get all the water out.
 
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I have seen tutorials with guys using smaller type compressors.....4cfm range. I'm sure they are not super fast though, but do seem to get job done. What type of machine are you using?
 

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dgarcia said:
I have seen tutorials with guys using smaller type compressors.....4cfm range. I'm sure they are not super fast though, but do seem to get job done. What type of machine are you using?
A rigid. Just like the ones at home depot.
 
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BPWY said:
4 cfm??????????? my gas compressor is twice that.... its not enough. Too slow.

4 cfm is doubtful to get all the water out.
Should get most, but it takes some work; that is why we now use a big old Craftsman with double that figure, but in the beginning we blew out and pressurized plenty with a cheap low CFM compressor!
 

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I use a 12.4 CFM Titan. Picked it up 2 years ago at a pawn shop for $300 barely used. It has done at least 500 wints/pressure tests. I have another BRAND NEW one in my shop picked up and another pawn shop still wrapped in plastic for $350. This one will run in series with the other one to blow sprinklers next week. You can see the force at 50 PSI from the hydrant photo. NO SUBSTITUTE FOR CFM!!!! Average time to blow out a water heater is 3-4 minutes and 2 of us can turn a wint on a 2 bath home in 20 minutes (+ a 30 min pressure test on the Fannie Mae reo's) but we have been working together for a long time and have a system.
 

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I've got a big tow behind rented for sprinkler system winterizes.

Had a house wint to do yesterday, turned the PSI down to 30 so not to blow any thing apart and winterized with that.
It went real quick like because the CFM was many times that of my 5.5 horse gas model.

I know there are "training" vids that show using a very small compressor to do the job.
I cannot imagine how ridiculously slow that is and I cannot imagine that a good job was done getting the water out of the lines.
 
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Winterizations

I agree....definitely need to add a disclaimer r.e. true plumbing of these lines. But then again, they are most certainly not paying plumbing rates.

I'm hoping to get to a pawn shop or CL and see if I can find one in the $3-400 range that hasn't already been used on 500 winterizations!

It's great having all the replies from everyone on my rookie questions. Thanks.
 
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Try using searchtempest.com it allows you to search multiple areas of craigslist at once without having to bounce all over the place. It was an excellent way for me to find some good used equipment. Picked up a cheap gas compressor last year on there for about 300 and its not bad. We just purchased a new Ridgid at Home D. a few weeks ago and it comes with a 3 year warranty and seems to work great. I was going to buy a Titan from a woman who owns a small tool shop down the street from me for 550 brand new but apparently somebody wanted it worse than I did and loaded on there pickup 'forgetting' to pay for it before I got there..... Guess he is probably the guy thats doing wints for $40 and couldnt afford one.:)
 
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Wow, speaking of wints for 40... Anyone here ever do any work for NFS? They want me to do a couple wints for them, and they wanted to question if I was familiar with and understood how to do a winterization, I responded with whats the pay...30 TO 35$$$$$$ I told them I didnt know how and wont be learning anytime sorry.
 
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Discussion Starter #16
Wints.

Tenec,

Unfortunately I will be one of the guys doing wints for $40. I sub for a company out of L.A and that's their price. Do we have room to negotiate with these companies? It seems that all I ever get is "this is the price and their is nothing we can do about it" line.

I have already turned down plenty of work because I'm not a total [email protected] and I have a business to run. And a family to feed and mortgages to pay (wouldn't that be ironic?). I'm just starting out and can see that as long as I'm the go between I will be getting the short end of the stick.

My problem is that I don't have the preservation experience, so before reaching out directly to local REO agents, advertising, etc. I want to know the business. This part is the hardest to wrap my head around since I am spending all kinds of time and money on my end but am definitely not seeing it from the other. Any words of advice from you or any one else on the board regarding this?

Ok, now I actually have to get to this work. And work from my original business! Have a good one people.
 
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Discussion Starter #17
From many years of experience in foreclosure work you are setting yourself up for bankruptcy. I can't turn enough profit at $80 net to offset expense and liability and theres no way you can at half price. we figure a 20% p/o is roughly your takehome so you are looking at $8.00 per home BEFORE they hammer you to start fixing plumbing damages that WILL occur..its inevitable at some point.
Sorry but its a very bad business decision and I wouldn't touch PLUS the company that is taking advantage of you should be shot...jmo
 
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Dgarcia,

Fremont is dead on. I truly understand you wanting to take on any work they will send your way BUT for the sake of everything that means anything to you (family, home, assets) don't accept this work that you will wind up paying to complete all while the service company you are doing it for is getting paid 5 times the amount they quoted you and they are just sending you a workorder.
You may think if you decline that work they won't send you any more, but that is probably for the best to be blunt. If you break down the numbers you will not make anything and the liability that comes with it for that price is just unreal.
You have to draw the line somewhere and realize its not about 'If I dont take this work I wont make any money' because alot of the times the reality is taking the work will make you bankrupt!
 
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Thanks for the words of encouragement? No, seriously, I totally understand your points....if this was the only thing I was doing I would have already scrapped it. To take a line from one of my favorite movies, "I'm not walking around with a born to lose sticker on my forehead"! It's completely clear and obvious that there is no way to run a healthy and profitable business based solely on work from this company I am contacting with. I was most interested in getting the secondary repair jobs as I figured there would be money at least in those. Sadly, these banks don't really care about needed repairs. Or paying for an honest days work.

I am going to keep going down this path smartly, and soon enough, cutting out the middle man completely. I understand this business has become saturated with bargain-basement guys doing substandard work, but that's not who I am. I take pride in what I am doing, even if these banks/institutions can give a rip. I am very interested in doing this for the long haul and being able to offer a quality service in my location. I am very interested in what you guys(experienced and knowledgeable pres. companies) have to say and offer and will glean as much as I can from you. Thanks again for the info. I do appreciate it.

Do any of you belong to any preservation associations?
 

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dgarcia said:
Do any of you belong to any preservation associations?



No, most associations like that exist only to take your money and make you feel good about what they aren't doing.
At $40 per wint you aint paying expenses let along money left over for your mortgage or buying into association dues.
I know you want to grow your biz but you aint going to be around to grow it when you are paying them out of your pocket for the privilege of working for them.
 
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