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What tools and equipment do you need when starting into property preservation? What things are an absolute must have?
 

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What tools and equipment do you need when starting into property preservation? What things are an absolute must have?
Quick, partial list:

1. Camera and a backup camera
2. Computer or laptop or tablet or all three
3. Truck and trailer
4. Gas powered air compressor and hoses and fittings for wints
5. Stock of knoblocks, deadbolts, lockboxes, padlocks, hasps, etc.
6. Mower, trimmer, blower
7. Full set of hand tools and mechanics tools
8. At least one year of side by side experience in P&P

9. A stack of cash, this high, to live off of for at least 6 months, possibly more


Possession of the above list is by no means an indication that you are ready to start a P&P business. There are probably thousands of others that had the equipment and the desire, but went broke in the process.

Good luck and be careful.
 

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I will re-emphasize #9. Just like any business you do need some starting capital. You will be paid on average in 45-60 days from work order completion. All gas, employee, tools, dump fees, etc etc expenses will have to be carried until then.

I never thought I would spend $1000 on doorknobs in my entire lifetime, but now it's a regular occurance. Ha.
 

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Hip waders and a degree in psychology to play the nationals games according to YOUR rules. Yes Your rules. DON'T let them push you around and if it feels like a bad job don't do it. Even after getting work orders to do a trash out i have been named in removal of personals lawsuits . The nationals WILL NOT defend you just cover their a## and leave you out to dry. Bitter NO just experience of 13 years here.

TOOL #10 an external hard drive to back up EVERYTHING on to so if in a couple of years you get a call about work done you have a clear photo record. In my state the former owners have up to 5, YES 5 years to start a legal procedure after loosing the property. Documentation is everything. I back up all photos invoices and authorizations for personal property removal. NO authorization NO removal. Let them, the nationals, take the liability !! They are making money off of us and they need to be shouldering the liability. Not us who are the people making the money and taking a lot of risk.
 

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5 years, wow!!!!!
 

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Tool #11- At least an 18V battery operated drill (more volts the better)
#12 - fist full of 7/16 or 1/4" hard steel drill bits
#13 - in you basic tool bag have an 8" flat head screwdriver and hammer
#14 - 36" and 18" bolt cutters. (sometimes the door chain is engaged on rear doors, sometimes there are padlocks to go through)
#15 - a battery operated sawsall. this comes in handy when the padlock is just too tough for the bolt cutter. Cut the hasp. Also, the chain is always softer than the padlock.

Now the use of all these tools is another story. If you are not experienced in how to gain access through the various brands of knob and deadbolt locks....that #8 above is the most indespensable item in the list. Not all locks are built equal.
 

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I have a 24 inch set of bolt cutters and extended the handles with 3/4" galv pipe to 40+ inches and they , the handles slip on off, store in my securing crate I have crates for all different types of services , milk cartons of locks ( different codes) so when ( and recently IF ) an order comes in I grab the assoaciated crates and boogie to the site.
 

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@Splinterpicker

That is something that I do as well, I have tool bags for each type job. (on every truck) One bag for lock changing, all the tools necessary to do a lock change in that bag. One bag for reglazing windows. One bag for winterization. A whole tool box, 48x24x24, for pool covering (if using the board and frame method) And then I have a bag that has nothing but wrenches and sockets in it. And a miscellaneous bag, this bag has all those tools that I don't need on a regular basis, but I have found the need arises and it's better to have them around than to not have them when you need them. :)

I have found this is a really good way to keep your tools in easy reach. There are specific tools you need for each job and it's better to keep them seperated so you can find them easily.

I thought I might be the only one that did this, glad to know I'm not. My crews thought I was crazy when I implemented the seperate bag for each job years ago. But now they see the wisdom. Instead of running back and forth from the truck with what tools you can carry, you have all the tools you need for a specific job, with the guy that's doing that part of the job.
And no more - "Who's got the *fill in blank*?", because each job has it's own set.

And one other thing I've taught my guys, when doing trash outs, if you find a tool (screwdriver, hammer, pump pliers, needlenose pliers, ect) that is something we use, throw it in the truck, and then when you get back to the office put it in a storage bin I have. That way, we always have replacements.
 
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I take pepper spray . Ok i cant figure how to start new thread . I need advice for post and store, the company i sub for wants to pay 20$ a cubic, same as debris removal plus storage bill for 30 days.... is it possible to make money??? Ps its ALWAYS OLD DIRTY CLOTHES AND STAINED BEDS JUNK REALLY please help thanks
 

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What tools and equipment do you need when starting into property preservation? What things are an absolute must have?

Well that's quite smart question according to me in start up one need proper capital for all such Gas , employee tools and all such stuff . And yes keep rules in mind and don't let them push you around .
 

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I would say it depends on what it is you are going to offer?

Some companies are on the trashout side, some on the evictions, some on the rehabs, and some that do nearly everything (such as me). Here is what I bring. May be more or less than what others use, as everyone has their own techniques.

Trashouts: Truck, trailer (dump pref), snow shovel, rake, brooms, gloves, mesh net to cover load, straps, and we usually keep some sledge hammers and misc tools in order to break things that are large (such as dog houses).

Janitorial: vac, shop vac, paper towels, oven cleaner (miracle for dirty floors under refer and stove), glass cleaner, pumice stone, glass cleaner, fabuloso, duster, mop, floor cleaner.

Yard: Mower, wacker, brooms, rake, shovel, sheers, pruners, hedgers, and blower.

Rekey: Drill, plenty of bits, two pry bars, locks, lockbox, window locks, slider locks, bolts for the garage door, ladder, CO detectors, and Smoke detectors.

Thats the basic items that we deal with on the initial side (we dont have any wints here in So Cal) We also have the following

Pool pumps, both sump, and reverse suction. Shop vacs for pool drain, and all the chemicals needed to treat the water before draining and after refilling the pool.

2 paint sprayers (graco 695 and backup lts17pro), along with all the drywall items needed, surface prep, and misc items. (my favorite item for this category has become the "Redtail" texture sprayer for matching texture in small amounts)

Plumbing: many different spare parts for 1.25-1.5" ptraps/discharge lines, misc stop valves, 3 different plumbers wrenches, specialty wrenches, misc copper pieces, and items to sweat lines, misc hoses for sinks, pressure tester. (almost all of my plumbing besides very basic is sub'd)

Electrical: Wire nuts, tape, face plates, few lights, meter, plug in receptical tester. (almost all of my elect outside of very basic is sub'd)

Compressor (we have two, one is larger for certain jobs, and one is a small pancake for smaller jobs that need the compressor moved around alot like base/casing.

Generators: We have two, because many houses have no power

Then the obvious as with any other contractor in misc saws, different types of hammers, sized drivers, chizzles, routers, mortising templates to replace doors, bolts and ply for boardups, window glaze, heat gun, and glass cutter for windows (single glaze old windows).

Most important is a good set of subs. Ive got my guys that I need for nearly anything. Carpet, windows, granite, cabinets, plumbing, electrical (although I may start looking for a new one), framing, roofing (especially with roof certs), HVAC.

With your subs, one thing to remember is that with the bank properties, many of the bids are being used to lower the price of the house. So if you know the general cost, then submit a bid yourself and dont have them go to every house. It will burn them out, just as people on the boards are getting burned out on the nationals sending them for misc bids. I will take a ton of pics and send them to the subs and see if they are able to provide me bids based on the pics alone.

If you are trying to do this for a living, dont be the guy out there cutting corners, and using cheap/impropper tools to get a job done. It shows and hurts everyone. I dont work for any nationals, so luckily I havent had the pleasure that some of the people here speak of.
 

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I would say it depends on what it is you are going to offer?

Some companies are on the trashout side, some on the evictions, some on the rehabs, and some that do nearly everything (such as me). Here is what I bring. May be more or less than what others use, as everyone has their own techniques.

Trashouts: Truck, trailer (dump pref), snow shovel, rake, brooms, gloves, mesh net to cover load, straps, and we usually keep some sledge hammers and misc tools in order to break things that are large (such as dog houses).

Janitorial: vac, shop vac, paper towels, oven cleaner (miracle for dirty floors under refer and stove), glass cleaner, pumice stone, glass cleaner, fabuloso, duster, mop, floor cleaner.

Yard: Mower, wacker, brooms, rake, shovel, sheers, pruners, hedgers, and blower.

Rekey: Drill, plenty of bits, two pry bars, locks, lockbox, window locks, slider locks, bolts for the garage door, ladder, CO detectors, and Smoke detectors.

Thats the basic items that we deal with on the initial side (we dont have any wints here in So Cal) We also have the following

Pool pumps, both sump, and reverse suction. Shop vacs for pool drain, and all the chemicals needed to treat the water before draining and after refilling the pool.

2 paint sprayers (graco 695 and backup lts17pro), along with all the drywall items needed, surface prep, and misc items. (my favorite item for this category has become the "Redtail" texture sprayer for matching texture in small amounts)

Plumbing: many different spare parts for 1.25-1.5" ptraps/discharge lines, misc stop valves, 3 different plumbers wrenches, specialty wrenches, misc copper pieces, and items to sweat lines, misc hoses for sinks, pressure tester. (almost all of my plumbing besides very basic is sub'd)

Electrical: Wire nuts, tape, face plates, few lights, meter, plug in receptical tester. (almost all of my elect outside of very basic is sub'd)

Compressor (we have two, one is larger for certain jobs, and one is a small pancake for smaller jobs that need the compressor moved around alot like base/casing.

Generators: We have two, because many houses have no power

Then the obvious as with any other contractor in misc saws, different types of hammers, sized drivers, chizzles, routers, mortising templates to replace doors, bolts and ply for boardups, window glaze, heat gun, and glass cutter for windows (single glaze old windows).

Most important is a good set of subs. Ive got my guys that I need for nearly anything. Carpet, windows, granite, cabinets, plumbing, electrical (although I may start looking for a new one), framing, roofing (especially with roof certs), HVAC.

With your subs, one thing to remember is that with the bank properties, many of the bids are being used to lower the price of the house. So if you know the general cost, then submit a bid yourself and dont have them go to every house. It will burn them out, just as people on the boards are getting burned out on the nationals sending them for misc bids. I will take a ton of pics and send them to the subs and see if they are able to provide me bids based on the pics alone.

If you are trying to do this for a living, dont be the guy out there cutting corners, and using cheap/impropper tools to get a job done. It shows and hurts everyone. I dont work for any nationals, so luckily I havent had the pleasure that some of the people here speak of.
CSREO that was a great post. I have a serious question, is this line of work worth getting into? I have an opportunity to possibly purchase an established PP business, or do the contracts on a percentage basis 80%-20% split, numbers haven't been finalized. I take great pride in my ability, character, and my integrity. As a veteran, I see that there is a possibility of obtaining a Small Business Administration (SBA) loan. I need someone to be very candid and let me know if the stress is worth it. I have full time employment in education, so this is not a fall back plan. I am looking at ways to make money and possibily own my own family business. Thank you
 

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If you are looking to MAKE money there are other better ways of doing it.

P&P is a fast track ship to the bottom.
 

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CSREO that was a great post. I have a serious question, is this line of work worth getting into? I have an opportunity to possibly purchase an established PP business, or do the contracts on a percentage basis 80%-20% split, numbers haven't been finalized. I take great pride in my ability, character, and my integrity. As a veteran, I see that there is a possibility of obtaining a Small Business Administration (SBA) loan. I need someone to be very candid and let me know if the stress is worth it. I have full time employment in education, so this is not a fall back plan. I am looking at ways to make money and possibily own my own family business. Thank you

Sorry for a late reply on this one. We have been very busy, and I have not had time to get on here too much. As far as getting into this business. It depends on which way you are going to go. Many different people have different experiences within the business. On a few of these forums, you will find a ton of moaning and groaning about the industry. In my experience, it has treated me well. However, I have NEVER worked for a national, so I do not have the horror stories that some people have. I have ONLY worked directly with the agents. Through 09, the work load was intense. We were working 15 hour days, 7 days a week, and could barely keep up with two dump trailers, and a dump truck. However, since the moritoriums, it has been pockets of slow. Wells let much of the rehab business go to Home Depot. I have not heard one good thing about that program from any of the agents we work with. However, if you are able to get a contract with them in your area, that may be a possitive route for you. Remember, that in most cases, you will need a contractors license. We still do some of the foreclosure business, however, we have gone more into flipping houses in the last year. Which ever way you decide to go, best of luck to you.
 
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