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I need advise regarding mold remediation training and cert. please.
 

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Until Wannabe chimes in, start with the following.

Go to the IICRC.org website. Read about the classes they offer.

Wannabe suggested that I take WRT, FSRT, OCT, AMRT and ASD. So far, I have completed the first 3 classes listed above. AMRT and ASD are taught on location whereas the other classes are taught across the country. My plan is to get in the AMRT class sometime this spring.

I'm not looking to these classes/certifications for P&P. I'm planning on focusing on my construction and remodeling part of my company diversification.

As side note, my current renovation project requires lead and asbestos abatement. After seeing what the asbestos companies are charging, you may want to look into that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Until Wannabe chimes in, start with the following.

Go to the IICRC.org website. Read about the classes they offer.

Wannabe suggested that I take WRT, FSRT, OCT, AMRT and ASD. So far, I have completed the first 3 classes listed above. AMRT and ASD are taught on location whereas the other classes are taught across the country. My plan is to get in the AMRT class sometime this spring.

I'm not looking to these classes/certifications for P&P. I'm planning on focusing on my construction and remodeling part of my company diversification.

As side note, my current renovation project requires lead and asbestos abatement. After seeing what the asbestos companies are charging, you may want to look into that.
Lead cert. and waiting for builder license:)!

Was the class difficult? WRT, FSRT, OCT, AMRT and ASD - How many classroom hours?
 

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Lead cert. and waiting for builder license:)!

Was the class difficult? WRT, FSRT, OCT, AMRT and ASD - How many classroom hours?
WRT was 2 days
FSRT was 2 days
OCT was 1 day

Classes were pretty easy, just spend a couple hours at night reviewing the instruction manual. The big downside for me was all three classes I had were 95+ % employees whose boss sent them. Not many business owners so the dialogue could have been more beneficial for me if it wasn't people being required to be there. The one thing that I greatly enjoyed was how knowledgable the instructors were. They had numerous (20 +) years experience and were teaching from real life examples.
 

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Brad is 100% correct about the instructors and the classes. The IICRC and the IAQA instructors are very knowledgable and very very helpful. Most, if not all, will give you their phone numbers and you can call them anytime.
 

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If I could add something I would be careful about falling for all the different acronyms. IICRC and IAQA are the two main associations and they know that while adding new certs. may enhance ones knowledge it also makes more money.

The difference between associations? Not much. In a nutshell, IICRC is more carpet cleaning world while IAQA is more indoor air quality (IH stuff). Save yourself time and money and pick one association to belong to and get the cert that best fits your needs. There are some independent service providers for them, and plenty of ones who are peddling their own curriculum with no recognized certification.

Are you going to be doing inspections or remediation? That's going to dictate the type of cert you want to get. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If I could add something I would be careful about falling for all the different acronyms. IICRC and IAQA are the two main associations and they know that while adding new certs. may enhance ones knowledge it also makes more money.

The difference between associations? Not much. In a nutshell, IICRC is more carpet cleaning world while IAQA is more indoor air quality (IH stuff). Save yourself time and money and pick one association to belong to and get the cert that best fits your needs. There are some independent service providers for them, and plenty of ones who are peddling their own curriculum with no recognized certification.

Are you going to be doing ? That's going to dictate the type of cert you want to get. Hope this helps.
Yes both inspections and remediation.
 

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Since I two am looking into getting mold certified thanks for all the advise. We have been looking at some of the methods that Co's use. anybody here use the dry ice method? Also what are do of the agents that they are spraying on the surface? Just trying to get an Idea of the cost of some of the equipment needed
 

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It was stated by Guyck that IICRC is for mainly "carpet cleaning" ..... wrong.

IICRC is the body that writes the guidelines. Does IICRC include other services besides mold, fire, water, drying? Yes they include most all types of certification programs for cleaning type services.

IAQA is more the "scientific" types... (Doctors, Hygentists, Scientists) and promote testing and protocol scopes for restoration. It still follows the IICRC guidelines. Great organization if you wanna rub elbows with the Scientists :)
 

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Since I two am looking into getting mold certified thanks for all the advise. We have been looking at some of the methods that Co's use. anybody here use the dry ice method? Also what are do of the agents that they are spraying on the surface? Just trying to get an Idea of the cost of some of the equipment needed
Yes we dryice blast. Expensive but can be used in a lot of different jobs. A good dryice blaster can run upwards of $25,000

http://youtu.be/mcNIG9q4mR0
 

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Yes Wannabe your correct. IICRC is more the guidelines. The point I made poorly was that originally IICRC came from the Carpet cleaning,drydown and restoration side of things. It was many years ago that the two associations decided to focus on their respected niches and IICRC took the lead on restoration/remediation guidelines such as S520 and S500. Thats why I asked whether the individual asking the question was interested in inspection versus remediation. IAQA might be better if they are wanting to be an inspector or IH. The point is dont go crazy with a bunch of certs that are not going to benefit you. If your doing restoration work then its a good idea to belong to IICRC anyways.

As far as cryoblasting, your right the machines are expensive and the applications may be limited depending on the type of work the contractor does most. I would be interested to hear some of the advantages and disadvantages you have encountered using the method.

I know for us we found that along with cryoblasting, soda blasting also has its advantages and disadvantages. One disadvantage with soda blasting the baking soda can react with components such as flex ducts and deteriorate the outer plastic layer in certain climates. With both techniques applicators have to remember its like cutting the dandelions in your yard, the 2x's may look clean but the roots may still be in the substrate and possibly viable which means if the moisture problem hasnt been corrected its possible the mold will come back. Of course Im speaking in regards to mold applications only. As stated elsewhere, there are good applications for the tool, but its not a silver bullet.
 

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Ice blasting is good for serious mold discoloration. In todays environment there are several chemical applications that can work nearly as good with a MUCH lower cost to the client.

We primarily use it on fire restoration. It is more expensive, media wise, than soda BUT a lot lower cost on labor due to the cleanup. Basically a "wash" on cost.

My pro vs cons:

Soda: lower media cost, secondary benefit on fire/soot with the natural neutralizer on smoke damage and a heck of a lot warmer to use! Con: Lots of cleanup time.

Dryice: Virtually no cleanup and easy to use. Con: Colder than heck on the hands, face....ENTIRE body and you got to keep fresh air at all times blowing into any confined area due to the dryice removes oxygen from the breathable air. Need the largest of Air Compressors to be real effective--300CFM.

Just fun to use! :)

Couple more videos from same job.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=36DQo61Xe2I

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcNIG9q4mR0
 
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