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I have a situation where a vacant home has been so for 2 years, I winterization was performed and now the owners want to sell the home. How long is a winterization good for and should the winterization be "refreshed" annually ?
 
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B.D.R. said:
You do it, and you don't know!
I didnt do the winterization I wanted to know for the home owner if there was an industry standard regarding winterization warranty my polficy is recheck annually if home remains vacant.
 
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A warranty? I'm sure the Service Company will tell ya that theres a 100% guarantee against the contractor that did the winterize. Personally there is never a guarantee.
 
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FremontREO said:
A warranty? I'm sure the Service Company will tell ya that theres a 100% guarantee against the contractor that did the winterize. Personally there is never a guarantee.
I guarantee..... I guarantee that I don't provide a warranty against future breaches in the integrity of the dwellings plumbing system, expressed or implied, period.....:no:
 

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We go into property every day that someone has peed in the sink or tub, stolen the copper, vandalized the water heater, etc. Faucet seals dry out and fail, shut off valves corrode. You cannot warranty something that is left unattended for so long. You can take your photos and verify the condition at the time you were there.
Experience has shown however, that antifreeze in our areas tend to evaporate after about 90-120 days.
 

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Well, there's two ways to look at it. If you do as the client wants, and remove all water from the system (which isn't possible) and then add anti-freeze, when the anti-freeze evaporates there shouldn't be any liquid in the system to freeze and cause damage. However, as has been stated there are other ways the system can be damaged through non-maintenence.

Second way, if you leave a little water in the toilet bowl and tank, then add a good amount of anti-freeze to the water, the liquid will not evaporate as fast and the anti-freeze will stay in the system longer. Plus. you must leave enough water in the bowl to prevent a back flow of sewer gases. (which is why a toilet is built the way it is, to trap water and prevent the back flow.) sucking the water out of a toilet with a shop-vac is a waste of time, IMHO. Just pour the pink liquid until it's all pink.

I will state here that there is no guarantee/waranty - stated or implied on a winterization. But, you can and will be held accountable for any "freeze" damage found at the property after you have completed a winterization. Best bet, do the best you can, don't scrimp on the anti-freeze, and TAKE GOOD PICTURES.
 
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You know what I love about the winterizes? When the house sits vacant for the 1 or 2 years after the winterize was completed and the gaskets all dry out on the faucets and the realtor comes along and needs a dewz for a home inspection and the service company brings in a hack who turns the water on and leaves!!!!

Gotta love those chargebacks.
 

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BamaPPC said:
Well, there's two ways to look at it. If you do as the client wants, and remove all water from the system (which isn't possible) and then add anti-freeze, when the anti-freeze evaporates there shouldn't be any liquid in the system to freeze and cause damage. However, as has been stated there are other ways the system can be damaged through non-maintenence.

Second way, if you leave a little water in the toilet bowl and tank, then add a good amount of anti-freeze to the water, the liquid will not evaporate as fast and the anti-freeze will stay in the system longer. Plus. you must leave enough water in the bowl to prevent a back flow of sewer gases. (which is why a toilet is built the way it is, to trap water and prevent the back flow.) sucking the water out of a toilet with a shop-vac is a waste of time, IMHO. Just pour the pink liquid until it's all pink.

I will state here that there is no guarantee/waranty - stated or implied on a winterization. But, you can and will be held accountable for any "freeze" damage found at the property after you have completed a winterization. Best bet, do the best you can, don't scrimp on the anti-freeze, and TAKE GOOD PICTURES.
I leave NO water behind. In the dead of winter here the Anti-Freeze in the bed of my truck turns to slush. I have to keep a few gallons on the floor of my truck so it's pourable............................
 

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mtmtnman said:
I leave NO water behind. In the dead of winter here the Anti-Freeze in the bed of my truck turns to slush. I have to keep a few gallons on the floor of my truck so it's pourable............................
In your case then I guess that's advisable. Here in Alabama, we don't get such harsh conditions.
 

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mtmtnman said:
I leave NO water behind. In the dead of winter here the Anti-Freeze in the bed of my truck turns to slush. I have to keep a few gallons on the floor of my truck so it's pourable............................
We have the same problem in Utah.
 

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FremontREO said:
You know what I love about the winterizes? When the house sits vacant for the 1 or 2 years after the winterize was completed and the gaskets all dry out on the faucets and the realtor comes along and needs a dewz for a home inspection and the service company brings in a hack who turns the water on and leaves!!!!

Gotta love those chargebacks.




Thats called thinning the shallow end of the business gene pool.
 
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